NASA has finally launched the James Webb Space Telescope

NASAs 10 billion James Webb Space Telescope will study scaled

NASA has finally launched the James Webb Space Telescope. On Christmas morning, the telescope launched from the European Spaceport in French Guiana on the Arianespace Ariane 5 rocket after 14 years of development and several delays.

The JSWT orbits the sun, near the second Lagrange point of the Earth-Sun system. It will take about a month to reach its destination, after which researchers will be able to look into black holes, look at some of the oldest galaxies in the universe and evaluate the potential of several exoplanets.

NASA partnered with the European and Canadian space agencies to develop the project. The JSWT has been delayed for a long history. NASA had initially hoped to launch it in 2007, but spinning costs forced engineers to rethink the telescope in 2005. The JSWT was then announced ready for completion in 2022, but the project was postponed. again due to construction problems. The telescope was assembled in 2022, but then the pandemic hit COVID-19, leading to delays in testing and shipping.

After the JWST finally reached the spaceport, NASA set a start date of December 18th. However, it delayed its publication to this day due to last minute inspections and a lack of favorable weather. But, what is a few days for such an important, long mission at work? The final JWST is at an all-time high, and in the coming months we will begin to learn some of its findings.

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